regard


regard
regard n Regard, respect, esteem, admiration, and their corresponding verbs (regard, respect, esteem, admire) are comparable when they mean a feeling, or to have a feeling, for someone or something which involves recognition of that person's or thing's worth and some degree of liking.
Regard is the most colorless as well as the most formal of these words
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please give him my regards

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It usually requires qualification to reinforce and orient its meaning
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held in slight regard by his neighbors

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she learned to hope that it [the past] . . . might not cost her Henry's entire regardAusten

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Steve had not been highly regarded in his hometown— Anderson

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Respect usually implies careful evaluation or estimation of the worth of a person or thing and of the measure of recognition which is due him or it
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he respected their views even though he could not agree with them

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he held their opinions in slight respect

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one wants to produce in the child the same respect for the garden that restrains the grown-ups from picking wantonly— Russell

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Often respect implies such a show of deference or veneration as is proper from a junior or an inferior
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the respect, amounting almost to worship, he sometimes saw in the eyes of the people— Anderson

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Sometimes it suggests observance of what is proper or fitting
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show respect for the dead

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respected the wishes of his parents

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and sometimes it suggests recognition of something as sacred or inviolable
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respect a person's privacy

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have respect for the rights of others

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Esteem adds to respect the implications of a high valuation with a consequent prizing and of warmth of feeling or attachment
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what things there are most abject in regard and dear in use! What things again most dear in the esteem and poor in worth!— Shak.

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in the Renaissance, no Latin author was more highly esteemed than Seneca— T. S. Eliot

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Admiration and admire, like esteem, imply a recognition of superiority, but they usually connote more enthusiastic appreciation, and sometimes suggest genuine affection
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Miss Welwood, I have long felt the deepest esteem for you, and your present courageous attitude in this distressing financial crisis has added admiration to esteemDeland

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Sometimes the words stress the personal attractiveness of the object of admiration, and weaken the implication of esteem
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what sight... is sadder than the sight of a lady we admire admiring a nauseating picture?— L. P. Smith

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Analogous words: deference, *honor, homage, reverence: appreciation, cherishing, prizing, valuing (see corresponding verbs at APPRECIATE)
Antonyms: despite
Contrasted words: contempt, scorn, disdain (see under DESPISE)
regard vb
1 respect, esteem, admire (see under REGARD n)
Analogous words: *appreciate, cherish, value, prize, treasure
Antonyms: despise
Contrasted words: contemn, scorn, disdain (see DESPISE): reject, repudiate, spurn (see DECLINE vb)
2 *consider, account, reckon, deem
Analogous words: rate, *estimate, value, assess, assay

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

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  • regard — [ r(ə)gar ] n. m. • regart 980; de regarder 1 ♦ Action, manière de diriger les yeux vers un objet, afin de le voir; expression des yeux de la personne qui regarde. Le regard humain. « Les voleurs, les espions, les amants, les diplomates, enfin… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • regard — Regard. s. m. Action de la veuë, action par laquelle on regarde. Regard fixe. regard languissant. regard amoureux. doux regard. regard favorable. il a le regard fier, le regard vif. regard rude, terrible, affreux, farouche, regard perçant. il luy …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Regard — Re*gard , n. [F. regard See {Regard}, v. t.] 1. A look; aspect directed to another; view; gaze. [1913 Webster] But her, with stern regard, he thus repelled. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. Attention of the mind with a feeling of interest; observation;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • regard — Regard, ou regardure, Aspectus, Conspectus, Despectus, Prospectus, Respectus, Contuitus, Intuitus, Spectatio, Visio. Regard {{o=Regarder}} qu on fait de tous costez, Circunspectus. Un regard plus agu et ardant, Aspectus vegetior. Un ferme regard …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • regard — [ri gärd′] n. [ME < OFr < regarder: see RE & GUARD] 1. a firm, fixed look; gaze 2. consideration; attention; concern [to have some regard for one s safety] 3. respect and affection; esteem [to have high regard for one s teachers] …   English World dictionary

  • regard — 1. Regard is used in a number of complex prepositions, as regards, in regard to, with regard to, as well as the form regarding; all have more or less the same meaning, although the first three are more common at the beginning of sentences. 2. In… …   Modern English usage

  • Regard — Re*gard (r?*g?rd ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Regarded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Regarding}.] [F. regarder; pref. re re + garder to guard, heed, keep. See {Guard}, and cf. {Reward}.] 1. To keep in view; to behold; to look at; to view; to gaze upon. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • regard — [n1] attention, look care, carefulness, cognizance, concern, consciousness, curiosity, gaze, glance, heed, interest, interestedness, mark, mind, note, notice, observance, observation, once over*, remark, scrutiny, stare, view; concepts… …   New thesaurus

  • regard — ► VERB 1) think of in a particular way. 2) gaze at in a specified fashion. 3) archaic pay attention to. ► NOUN 1) heed or concern: she rescued him without regard for herself. 2) high opinion; esteem. 3) a steady …   English terms dictionary

  • regard — I (attention) noun advertence, advertency, alertness, application, attentiveness, care, concentration, concern, consideration, examination, heed, needfulness, intentness, interest, mindfulness, notice, observation, scrutiny, vigilance, watch,… …   Law dictionary